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U.S. Obesity Rate Could Reach 50% by 2030.

New research published in the New England Journal of Medicine has estimated that by the year 2030 the obesity rate will reach 48.9%, which means that nearly 1 in 2 adults will be obese.

In 1976 the obesity rate was 15% among adults. Despite increasing knowledge of nutrition and dieting, the obesity rate has been steadily increasing. The CDC reports that the rate of obesity for adults today in the United States is 39.8%, affecting approximately 93.3 million Americans.

If trends continue, that number will grow to 164 million.

“The findings suggest with high predictive accuracy that by 2030 nearly 1 in 2 adults will have obesity (48.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 47.7 to 50.1), and the prevalence will be higher than 50% in 29 states and not below 35% in any state. Nearly 1 in 4 adults is projected to have severe obesity by 2030 (24.2%; 95% CI, 22.9 to 25.5), and the prevalence will be higher than 25% in 25 states.”²

That could result in increased medical costs that exceed $100 Billion (according to CDC figures the medical cost for people with obesity is $1,429 higher than those of normal weight).

An increase in the obesity rate would also mean an increase in obesity-related conditions such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

no state has less than 20% obesity rate

When it comes to losing weight, most people have trouble succeeding on their own. Experts agree that patients have the best success when doctors encourage participation in a specific weight loss program. A year-long study of 134 participants found that patients lost most weight when “health care providers gave specific advice that reinforced the comprehensive weight-loss program.”³

A medically supervised weight loss program offers patients the best chance for success

1. CDC. (2018). Adult Obesity Facts. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html
2. Ward, Z. et al. (2019). Projected U.S. State-Level Prevalence of Adult Obesity and Severe Obesity. NEJM. Retrieved from: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa1909301
3. Duke University. (2019, March 20). Generic advice doesn’t help patients drop pounds: Patients shed more weight when doctors give specific tips, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 19, 2019 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190320153929.htm